Re: regulations

#2
bitcoin is not legally recognized as a digital currency or payment method by Spanish law. However, this does not mean that the cryptocurrency is illegal in the territory since it is accepted as a digital currency nationwide, a vision that is based on the recommendations of the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) and that the It catalogs according to the Spanish civil code as a "non-material good". :shock:
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Re: Bitcoin regulations in Mexico and Spain

#3
Given the growth in the popularity of collective funding, crowfunding, and payment platforms with bitcoins or cryptocurrencies in Mexico, the National Banking and Securities Commission (CNBV) considers the enactment of the Fintech Law to be a pressing need, in order to to reduce fraud, fraud and money laundering events that could occur with these technologies.
:roll:
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Re: Bitcoin regulations in Mexico and Spain

#4
josehernandez wrote:
January 31st, 2018, 8:35 pm
Does anyone know if the use of bitcoin is regulated in Mexico or Spain?
In Mexico, the initiative to regulate technological financial institutions in the Senate is about to be approved. The "fintech law", as it is better known, will give more options for using financial services from a computer, telephone or tablet, such as paying for services, requesting financing in companies other than banks, e. even use virtual currencies like bitcoin.
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Re: Bitcoin regulations in Mexico and Spain

#5
The European Commission approved on 5 July a proposal for a Directive to strengthen the EU anti-money laundering rules with the aim of combating the financing of terrorism and increasing transparency on the real ownership of companies and trust funds.
This proposal for a Directive is the first European initiative to implement the Action Plan to fight against the financing of terrorism of February 2016, and in relation to the activity of the Virtual Currency sector we can consider that it is the first legislative initiative European regulation of this sector, following the recommendations European Central Bank, which in its February 2015 Report on Virtual Currencies established that Virtual Currencies were not regulated, and that national and European authorities should use the existing legislative frameworks of regulation and supervision so that they are applicable to the Virtual Currencies through their modification and adaptation.
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Re: Bitcoin regulations in Mexico and Spain

#6
rociaortega wrote:
February 13th, 2018, 3:04 pm
The European Commission approved on 5 July a proposal for a Directive to strengthen the EU anti-money laundering rules with the aim of combating the financing of terrorism and increasing transparency on the real ownership of companies and trust funds.
This proposal for a Directive is the first European initiative to implement the Action Plan to fight against the financing of terrorism of February 2016, and in relation to the activity of the Virtual Currency sector we can consider that it is the first legislative initiative European regulation of this sector, following the recommendations European Central Bank, which in its February 2015 Report on Virtual Currencies established that Virtual Currencies were not regulated, and that national and European authorities should use the existing legislative frameworks of regulation and supervision so that they are applicable to the Virtual Currencies through their modification and adaptation.
This regulation reaches Spain as a member of the European Union.
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